Going out with a bang with artist Nicolas V. Sanchez!

Posted on Posted in #100rejectionletters, Art conversation, Artist, Nicolas V. Sanchez, Rejection Chronicles
Self portrait *, colored ballpoint pen, 5 x 7 in, 2014

I am so excited to introduce you to Nicolas V. Sanchez. I wanted to end 2014 with one of my favorite artists-RC will be back in January 2015 featuring more amazing artists and some really great authors! I got to meet Nico while I was still in school and remember marveling at his incredible paintings. Not only is he an amazingly multi-talented artist, he is a really wonderful person.

Sanchez at work. Image courtesy of the artist.
Sanchez at work. Image courtesy of the artist.

Sanchez lives and works in the New York area and recently completed a fellowship at the prestigious New York Academy of Art. His work is featured in the publication, The Figure, alongside the work of Eric Fischl, Jenny Saville and other top tier artists.  He is represented by Accesso Galleria in Italy and will be featured in a solo exhibition there in July 2015. You can also find his work  in a two person show in Brooklyn, the Small is Beautiful exhibition at Flower’s Gallery in New York and a group show at Island Weiss Gallery, also in New York.  Not only will Sanchez’s work will  be a part of the 2015 Venice Biennale-he will be participating in a month long residency in Venice for the month of March.  2015 is shaping up to be a busy year for this talented (and well deserving) artist!

Heiress *, oil on canvas, 24 x 30 in, 2014  Image courtesy of the artist.
Heiress *, oil on canvas, 24 x 30 in, 2014 Image courtesy of the artist.
Bloodline *, oil on linen, 48 x 72 in, 2013  Image courtesy of the artist.
Bloodline *, oil on linen, 48 x 72 in, 2013 Image courtesy of the artist.

As much as I would love to sit down over a cup of coffee and talk with Nicolas, I would really prefer to have that cup of coffee in his studio and hear him talk about his pieces one by one! Working in oils, charcoals and in ink, his work is meticulously crafted and it seems that everything he creates is infused with meaning and spirit.

Puerta Verde *, oil on linen, 42 x 50 in, 2014  Image courtesy of the artist.
Puerta Verde *, oil on linen, 42 x 50 in, 2014 Image courtesy of the artist.

Welcome to the Rejection Chronicles Nico and thank you for taking the time to share your experiences-I am thrilled to have you here!! As always, I will start with a couple fun questions and then dive into the more serious ones.

What is your favorite drink to unwind with?

One thing I need to have is coffee!

What books are you reading now and why?

I recently borrowed a book from a friend on John Singer Sargent’s watercolor works. It’s amazing.

If you weren’t an artist what would you be doing?

Optimistically, I would be pursuing a career in teaching. It’s still something I hope to do someday. I might also still be teaching dance.

What is something about yourself that people don’t know about you?

Something that people are often surprised to learn about me is that I never had alcohol and I have never tried a cigarette.

Who/what is a major influence on your work that people might not realize?

Artists that I admire and inspire me are choreographers Mia Michaels and Travis Wall. They are amazing contemporary dance choreographers that I have looked up to for many years.

What has been your most memorable rejection?

My most memorable rejection has to be when I was right out of high school and I applied to be in a major mid-Michigan art fair. I was very naive going into the application process and I just wasn’t ready. It made me want to develop my work even further.

Has rejection changed how you thought about your work or changed your direction in any way?

Rejection has taught me to work harder and strive to be better while searching for new opportunities to make new discoveries in my work and myself. It doesn’t always mean to make more work or put in longer studio hours. It also means to take time to re-evaluate my passion, my overall goals and where I stand at any given point. It helps me remember where I’ve been so that I continue to grow.

Can rejection be a positive thing?

Definitely. I think rejection always brings us closer to success in whatever way we define success. If ever faced with rejection, I always use it as a springboard to get me to the thing I’m chasing after in the first place.

What advice would you offer to other artist’s or folks in general, about rejection?

Rejection is more like a guided hand steering you closer in the direction of your goals. The benefit of pursuing a career as an artist is that there are many ways we get to define success and there are equally as many ways to achieve it.

Again, thank you so much. Learning from the experiences of others is such a valuable experience and I know other artists will love to hear from you as much as I did!

To learn more about Sanchez’s work please visit his website.

Image courtesy of the artist.
Colored Ball Point pen *, 5 x 7 in, 2014

See you in 2015 and here’s wishing you a beautiful new year!